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Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 8 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 7 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 6 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 5 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 4 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 3 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 2 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial  Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson  Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson Interview March 2014 1 Model Photography Mikael Jansson Magazine Interview Fashion Photography Model Fashion Model Fashion Magazine Photography Fashion Magazine Fashion Editorial Fashion Anna Luisa Ewers  editorial

Interview Anna Luisa Ewers Mikael Jansson



More information about Fashion & Photography The fashion industry is a product of the modern age. Prior to the mid-19th century, most clothing was custom-made. It was handmade for individuals, either as home production or on order from dressmakers and tailors. By the beginning of the 20th century with the rise of new technologies such as the sewing machine, the rise of global capitalism and the development of the factory system of production, and the proliferation of retail outlets such as department stores clothing had increasingly come to be mass-produced in standard sizes and sold at fixed prices. Although the fashion industry developed first in Europe and America, as of 2014 it is an international and highly globalized industry, with clothing often designed in one country, manufactured in another, and sold world-wide. For example, an American fashion company might source fabric in China and have the clothes manufactured in Vietnam, finished in Italy, and shipped to a warehouse in the United States for distribution to retail outlets internationally. The fashion industry has long been one of the largest employers in the United States, and it remains so in the 21st century. However, U.S. employment declined considerably as production increasingly moved overseas, especially to China. Because data on the fashion industry typically are reported for national economies and expressed in terms of the industry's many separate sectors, aggregate figures for world production of textiles and clothing are difficult to obtain. However, by any measure, the clothing industry accounts for a significant share of world economic output. The fashion industry consists of four levels: the production of raw materials, principally fibers and textiles but also leather and fur the production of fashion goods by designers, manufacturers, contractors, and others retail sales various forms of advertising and promotion These levels consist of many separate but interdependent sectors,[which?] each devoted to the goal of satisfying consumer demand for apparel under conditions that enable participants in the industry to operate at a profit. Fashion photography has been in existence since the earliest days of photography. In 1856, Adolphe Braun published a book containing 288 photographs of Virginia Oldoini, Countess di Castiglione, a Tuscan noblewoman at the court of Napoleon III. The photos depict her in her official court garb, making her the first fashion model.[1] In the first decade of the 20th century, advances in halftone printing allowed fashion photographs to be featured in magazines. Fashion photography made its first appearance in French magazines such as La mode practique. In 1909, Conde Nast took over Vogue magazine and also contributed to the beginnings of fashion photography. In 1911, photographer Edward Steichen was "dared" by Lucien Vogel, the publisher of Jardin des Modes and La Gazette du Bon Ton, to promote fashion as a fine art by the use of photography. Steichen then took photos of gowns designed by couturier Paul Poiret. These photographs were published in the April 1911 issue of the magazine Art et De coration. According to Jesse Alexander, This is "...now considered to be the first ever modern fashion photography shoot. That is, photographing the garments in such a way as to convey a sense of their physical quality as well as their formal appearance, as opposed to simply illustrating the object." A modern fashion photograph by Inez van Lamsweerde Vogue was followed by its rival, Harper's Bazaar, and the two companies were leaders in the field of fashion photography throughout the 1920s and 1930s. House photographers such as Edward Steichen, George Hoyningen-Huene, Horst P. Horst and Cecil Beaton transformed the genre into an outstanding art form. In the mid-1930s as World War II approached, the focus shifted to the United States, where Vogue and Harper's continued their old rivalry. In 1936, Martin Munkacsi made the first photographs of models in sporty poses at the beach. Under the artistic direction of Alexey Brodovitch, Harper's Bazaar quickly introduced this new style into its magazine. House photographers such as Irving Penn, Martin Munkacsi, Richard Avedon, and Louise Dahl-Wolfe would shape the look of fashion photography for the following decades. Richard Avedon revolutionized fashion photography and redefined the role of the fashion photographer in the post-World War II era with his imaginative images of the modern woman. From 1939 and onward, what had previously been the flourishing and sizeable industry of fashion photography all but stopped due to the beginnings of World War II. The United States and Euope quickly diverged from one another. What had previously been a togetherness and inspired working relationship divulged as Paris was occupied and London under siege. Paris, the main fashion-power house of the time quickly became isolated from the United States especially with French Vogue shutting down for a brief hiatus in 1940.[4] With these changes, the photography based out of the USA gained a distinct Americana vibe models often posed with flags, American brand cars, and generally just fulfilling the American ideal. What did remain of the French and British fashion photography on the other hand often had a wartime overlay to the content. Cecil Beaton's 'Fashion is Indestructible' from 1945 displays a well-dressed woman viewing the rubble that once was Middle Temple in London. Similarly, Lee Miller began taking photos of women in Paris and London, modeling the latest designs for gas masks and bicycling with pincurlers in their hair, as they did not have electricity with which to curl their hair. Images such as these remain scarred into the face of fashion photography of the time and display a common sentiment among the fashionable world and the public. Even fashion photographers worked to document the issues surrounding and work towards a documentation of the time even if within the frame of fashion. These photos are an especially good indication of the fashionable emotions of the time. Many felt that fashion photography, during wartime especially, was frivolous and unnecessary. Yet, the few who worked to preserve the industry did so in new and inventive ways throughout the duration of the war. In postwar London, John French pioneered a new form of fashion photography suited to reproduction in newsprint, involving natural light and low contrast.

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Some fashion publications as additional or alternative options are

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A
A&F Quarterly
Audrey (magazine)
B
La Belle Assemble
BlackBook
The Boston Miscellany
Burda Style
C
Caf Magazine
Clear (magazine)
Clich Magazine
Coco Eco
Coilhouse
Complex (magazine)
Cosmopolitan (magazine)
Crash Magazine
D
The Delineator
Dossier Journal
E
Element Magazine
Eliza (magazine)
Elle (India)
Elle (magazine)
Elle Decor
Elle Girl
Essence (magazine)
Ever Manifesto
F
The Face (magazine)
Fashion Central (Pakistani magazine)
Fashion Forward
Femina (India)
Femina (Denmark)
Femme for DKNY
Femmes du Maroc
FHM (India)
Flaunt
Le Follet
Frankie (magazine)
FutureClaw
G
La Gazette du Bon Ton
Glam Philippines
Glamcult
G cont.
GOSH!
Gothic Beauty
H
Hairstyles
Harper's Bazaar
Hearty magazine
Hispanic (magazine)
Hobo (magazine)
The Home
The Hub (magazine)
Humsay
I
Icon (magazine)
InStyle
InStyle UK
Vogue Italia
J
Jane (magazine)
Jolie (magazine)
K
Kawanku (magazine)
L
Latina (magazine)
List of fashion magazines
Lucire
Lucky (magazine)
Lumire (magazine)
M
Madame Figaro
Mademoiselle (magazine)
Man's World (magazine)
Mao Mag
Marie Claire
Mean (magazine)
Metropolitan Home
Miasto Kobiet
MilK Magazine (France)
Mirabella
Missbehave
MODE (magazine)
More (magazine)
Movmnt
N
Nifty magazine
No Tofu
Numro
Nylon (magazine)
O
L'Officiel
L'Officiel Hommes
Oyster (magazine)
P
Paper (magazine)
Acne Paper
Peterson's Magazine
Plaza Magazine
POOSHESH
The Pop Manifesto
Purple (magazine)
R
Rebel Magazine
Remix (fashion magazine)
Revolutionart
Rubbish (magazine)
Russh
S
SER (magazine)
Sleazenation
Sneaker Freaker
Stylenoir
T
Tatler
Tatler (1709 journal)
Teen Vogue
This is a magazine
Tint (magazine)
The Tobe Report
Town & Country (magazine)
Treats!
Twill (magazine)
V
V (American magazine)
Vanity Fair (magazine)
Verve (magazine)
Vibe (magazine)
VIBE Vixen
VMAN
Vogue (magazine)
Vogue Paris
Vs. (magazine)
W
W (magazine)
Who, What, Wear
WMB 3D: World's Most Beautiful